Iran Review > Book Review
The Arab Uprisings: An Introduction
Thursday, January 24, 2013

The media has been saturated with stories about the Arab Uprisings. Yet, though much talked about, they are little understood. At Fair Observer, our goal is to enable you to make sense of the world and this book is our enterprise to ensure that you understand the uprisings a little better. The Arab Uprisings: An Introduction provides an accessible overview for the curious mind. Abul-Hasanat Siddique and Casper Wuite, the writers of the book, seek to explain what happened, why it happened, what is different, what may lie ahead and what can be done.

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Foreign Policy and a Turbulent World
Monday, January 21, 2013

The first decade of the 21st century has been one of the most incident-prone junctures of the contemporary history following the Cold War. As a result, the news dispatches as well as international developments during these ten years have been so voluminous that it makes conceptualization of those developments very difficult. 

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Iran: 5000 Years of Clothing, Jewellery & Cosmetics
Monday, January 21, 2013

This is the first book of its kind to cover the history of clothing, jewellery and cosmetics in Iran from 3000 BCE to the present time with high quality images. This pictorial history brings together the essentials of current research in all of these subjects in a coherent, easy-to-read format for the interested general public.

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Nuclear Iran: The Birth of an Atomic State
Saturday, January 5, 2013

The Iranian nuclear crisis has dominated world politics since the beginning of the century, with the country now facing increasing diplomatic isolation, talk of military strikes against its nuclear facilities and a disastrous Middle East war. Behind the rhetoric from all sides there is very little real understanding of Iran's nuclear strategy, and the history behind it which is now over fifty years old. This ground-breaking book argues that Iran's nuclear programme and the modern history of the country itself are irretrievably linked; and only by understanding one can we understand the other. 

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Going to Tehran: Why the United States Must Come to Terms with the Islamic Republic of Iran
Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Former analysts in both the Bush and Clinton administrations, the Leveretts offer a uniquely informed account of Iran as it actually is today, not as many have caricatured it or wished it to be. They show that Iran's political order is not on the verge of collapse, that most Iranians still support the Islamic Republic, and that Iran's regional influence makes it critical to progress in the Middle East. Drawing on years of research and access to high-level officials, Going to Tehran explains how Iran sees the world and why its approach to foreign policy is hardly the irrational behavior of a rogue nation. 

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Dying Empire: US Imperialism and Global Resistance
Friday, December 7, 2012

By the 1970s the global hegemony established by an American Empire in the post-World War II period faced increasing resistance abroad and contradictions at home. Contextualizing that hegemony, resistance and contradictions is the focus of Dying Empire. Presenting a wide-ranging synthesis of approaches, the book attempts to shed light on the construction of and challenges to the military, economic, and cultural imperial projects of the United States in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Opposing US imperialism and global domination, Francis Shor combines academic and activist perspectives to analyze the crises endemic to empire and to propose a vision for the realization of another more socially just world. The text incorporates the most recent critical discussions of US imperialism and globalization from above and below to illuminate the practices and possibilities for global resistance.

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Imperial Crossroads: The Great Powers and the Persian Gulf
Monday, November 19, 2012

At the junction of three great continents and oceanic trade routes that link the cities of the world, the Persian Gulf, like a magnet, has pulled powerful nations into its waters and adjacent lands for centuries. This study examines the contested history for control of the Gulf and its resources, concentrating on Portugal, Holland, Britain, and the United States, and concludes with a look at possible future involvement by India and China.

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Theories of Security
Thursday, November 15, 2012

The book is an effort to provide appropriate and relatively overarching literature on theories, systems and models of security. For this purpose, the book has been divided in four sections with 23 chapters focusing on “security studies, security theories, security systems, and security models.”

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Genocide In Iraq: The Case Against the UN Security Council and Member States
Thursday, November 1, 2012

Imposing sanctions on Iraq was one of the most heinous of crimes committed in the 20th century. Yet it has received little attention in the Anglo-American world. Despite the calamitous destruction resulting from the sanctions, no serious attempts by legal professionals, academics or philosophers have been undertaken to address the full scope of the immorality and illegality of such a criminal and unprecedented mass punishment. "Genocide in Iraq" offers a comprehensive coverage of Iraq's politics, its building, its destruction through aggression and sanctions, and an analysis of the legality of these sanctions from the point of view of international and human rights laws.

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An Enemy We Created: The Myth of the Taliban-Al Qaeda Merger in Afghanistan, 1970-2010
Saturday, October 13, 2012

To this day the belief is widespread that the Taliban and al-Qaeda are in many respects synonymous, that their ideology and objectives are closely intertwined and that they have made common cause against the West for decades. Such opinions have been stridently supported by politicians, media pundits and senior military figures, yet they have hardly ever been scrutinised or tested empirically. This is all the more surprising given that the West's present entanglement in Afghanistan is commonly predicated on the need to defeat the Taliban in order to forestall further terrorist attacks worldwide. There is thus an urgent need to re-examine the known facts of the Taliban-al Qaeda relationship and to tell the story of the Taliban's encounter with internationalist militant Islamism, which is what Alex Strick van Linschoten and Felix Kuehn set out to do in An Enemy We Created. 

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