Iran Review > Book Review
The Neoconservative Threat to World Order: Washington's Perilous War for Hegemony
Sunday, November 8, 2015

Paul Craig Roberts
This stellar collection of Paul Craig Roberts essays dating from February 2014 explores the extreme dangers in Washington's imposition of vassalage on other countries and Washington’s resurrection of distrust among nuclear powers, the very distrust that Reagan and Gorbachev worked to eliminate.

Text and Image in Medieval Persian Art
Sunday, November 8, 2015

Sheila S. Blair
Greater Iranian arts from the 10th to the 16th century are technically some of the finest produced anywhere. They are also intellectually engaging, showing the lively interaction between the verbal and the visual arts. Focusing on objects found in the main media at the time, Sheila S. Blair shows how artisans played with form, material and decoration to engage their audiences. She also shows how the reception of these objects has changed and that their present context has implications for our understanding of the past.

“Diplomat” Publishes Second Issue
Friday, October 9, 2015

The second issue of the Iranian journal Diplomat monthly has been published with Kayhan Barzegar as editor in chief. The journal joined Iranian media through a detailed interview in its first issue with Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on the Joint Comprehensive Program of Action (JCPOA) and its implications on regional cooperation. The cover of the second issue carries a cartoon of US President Barak Obama, which is related to the special dossier of this foreign and international policy monthly.

History of Bread in Iran
Friday, October 2, 2015

Willem Floor
Since ancient times, bread has been the staple diet of the peoples living in the Iranian plateau. In History of Bread in Iran, Willem Floor, one of the foremost scholars of Iranian history, describes the beginnings of agriculture and bread-making, and the various grains and other products that were, and are, used to make bread. He then delves into the making of dough in rural and urban areas, followed by an overview of baking techniques, and the many kinds of bread that were—and continue to be—made in Iran.

Enabling the Iranian Gas Export Options
Friday, September 11, 2015

Maximilian Kuhn
Maximilian Kuhn investigates one of the most pressing, yet neglected subjects in the field of global energy politics: the integration of the Iranian gas market. Possessing the world’s second-largest proven natural gas reserves, Iran is a hypothetical energy giant-in-waiting.

First Issue of Diplomat Monthly Published in Iran
Wednesday, August 26, 2015

The first issue of Diplomat Monthly has been published with Kayhan Barzegar, the Director of the Center for Middle East Strategic Studies and Chair of the Department of Political Science and International Relations at the Islamic Azad University’s Science and Research Branch, as Editor in Chief.

Iran Nuclear Negotiations: Accord and Détente since the Geneva Agreement of 2013
Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Nader Entessar and Kaveh L. Afrasiabi
This book seeks to provide readers with a comprehensive understanding of this agreement and the protracted process that preceded it. It examines in details the nuclear negotiations between Iran and the world powers, focusing on the origins and evolution of the Iran nuclear crisis, the unilateral and the multilateral sanctions. It also looks at the relationship between nuclear and various non-nuclear regional issues, as well as the long-term implications for the U.S.-Iran relations.

Iran's Nuclear Program and the Global South
Sunday, July 12, 2015

Michal Onderco
While the Iranian nuclear programme has attracted the attention of the international community and has been dealt with in various international forums, analyses of the responses so far have been largely limited to the study of Western countries. Studying the responses of India, Brazil, and South Africa to Iran's nuclear programme entails analysis of the foreign policies of the countries of the Global South.

Islamic Republic of Iran's Soft Power in Central Asia and Caucasus
Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Ja'far Haghpanah, Simin Shirazi- Moguiee, and Shiva Alizadeh
Eurasia is still the scene of the big game and intense rivalry among various powers, most of whom try to guarantee their short- and long-term interests through recourse to soft power. In view of the huge potential that the Islamic Republic has for getting ahead of many other actors in the field of soft power, it would not be befitting for Iran to lag behind other powers in this regard. This concern has been the main reason behind the compilation of this book.

The Oil Kings: How the U.S., Iran, and Saudi Arabia Changed the Balance of Power in the Middle East
Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Andrew Scott Cooper
Oil Kings is the story of how oil came to dominate U.S. domestic and international affairs. As Richard Nixon fought off Watergate inquiries in 1973, the U.S. economy reacted to an oil shortage initiated by Arab nations in retaliation for American support of Israel in the Arab- Israeli war. The price of oil skyrocketed, causing serious inflation. One man the U.S. could rely on in the Middle East was the Shah of Iran, a loyal ally whose grand ambitions had made him a leading customer for American weapons. Iran sold the U.S. oil; the U.S. sold Iran missiles and fighter jets.

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